Monthly Archives: November 2015

“Court costs?? I don’t have to worry about lawyer’s fees! I’ll represent myself!!”

This was the thought of Mr Veluppillai who decided to represent himself against his wife in divorce proceedings recently in what the judge called “a routine needs case after 20 years of marriage.” Not only did Mr Veluppillai not save himself money, he ended up with a costs order against him of £150,000.It seems that the Judge found in favour of his wife whose proposals were described by commentators as eminently sensible. A lose lose situation for Mr Veluppillai.

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Admittedly this case is extreme. Here, the husband did cause there to be over 30 hearings in front of the court, he ended up assaulting his wife’s barrister and his wife in court, was convicted of assault, fled the country and sent the court abusive emails saying he had a fatal illness and that the proceedings should be adjourned indefinitely! The eventual outcome was that an order was made allowing the wife to sell off one property to pay off the mortgage on another and this also provided a fund for her to set up a business, amongst other things.

The point to take from this is that going to court, whether in person or with your lawyer, means engaging in a battle, starting a fight and sometimes people lose perspective in their desire to win. But there is no winner here. The bottom line is that there is less money available to divide between the separating couple at the end of the day. And immense bad feeling between them.

Another approach is mediation. In mediation we start from the place where separating couples say: “it went wrong, we can’t put it right but by blaming and punishing nothing is mended. Let’s work together to build workable futures for us both”.

Yes. We do tell clients that this is hard work.  But a lot less stressful than fighting and cheaper than the £150,000 that Mr Veluppillai will be handing over to his ex-wife’s lawyers.

Courts are deliberately misled by a quarter of divorce petitions

The introduction of a no-fault divorce petition is the subject of a 10 minute motion which was debated in the Commons on the 13th October.

The law should not require couples to “throw mud at each other” and instead should allow for divorce without blame. A simple signed declaration by each party to a divorce that the marriage had broken down irretrievably should be sufficient.

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Research conducted by YouGov in June 2015 found that 52% of divorce petitions were fault based and that 27% of divorcing couples who asserted blame in their petition admitted the allegation was not true.

Support for no fault divorce has also come from Resolution. Their chairman has said “fault based petitions are outdated, unfair and in need of urgent reform. Its not about making divorce easier – its about making it easier for people to move on. The current system is causing couples to make false allegations to have their divorce finalised in a reasonable time. The charade needs to be ended”.

The removal of blame from the divorce process would bring England and Wales into line with other jurisdictions including the US, Australia and Spain.